Eric Lefkofsky Develops Big Data System to Facilitate Cancer Treatment

Chicago-based entrepreneur, Eric Lefkofsky, has scored multiple success with Tempus, a company which uses a data-driven approach to combating cancer. It recently procured $80 million from fundraising. This achievement increased Tempus’ value to in excess of $1 billion and put it in the rank of unicorn status. According to the Chicago Tribune this is a rare accomplishment for a Chicago-based company.

To date Tempus has raised over $210 million, due to large firm investors. New Enterprise Associates and Revolution Growth previously funneled funds into Tempus and have been joined by T. Rowe Price Associates and Kinship Trust Co. The latest capital investments will go to increasing Tempus’ “clinical and molecular analytic platform,” according to the Chicago Tribune.

According to Lefkofsky, who co-founded Tempus in 2015, the company was developed out of frustration with a health care system that too often let powerful data and real world evidence go to waste.” Lefkofsky made this observation after a family member was diagnosed with cancer.

Lefkofsky said Tempus is “in a unique position to help usher in an era of precision medicine to support patients battling disease.”

Clinical and molecular data will be gathered from patients then combined and structured in an organized form. According to the news report, organizing a patient’s database could be as simple as adding a handwritten note to their file.

By adding structure more personalized options for treatment will be available and beneficial for the involved stakeholders. Physicians will have access to learning tools, newer patients will receive the same quality treatment as previous patients and drug companies will be able to enhance the drug development process.

Big data analytics will be the primary focus in facilitating cancer therapy at Tempus. Human genome sequencing coupled with advances in science and technology provides innumerable details from a large medical system.

Tempus laboratories, which are certified by CAP/CLIA, include comprehensive DNA and RNA sequencing and has a data processing capability to process 50,000 patients annually.

Read More: www.lightbank.com/team/eric-lefkofsky

Higher Quality Cancer Treatments & Dr. Clay Siegall’s Brilliance

Brilliance can come in many different forms, and it can come from many different sectors of business. For the never-ending fight against cancer, brilliance has gone on to save millions of lives in the United States and for the rest of the world. Dr. Clay Siegall, CEO of biotech-giant Seattle Genetics, has displayed brilliance throughout his professional career. This man is a scientist, a doctor and a well-known hero. He has also worked with major medical-related institutions such as Bristol Myers Squibb and the National Cancer Institute. Not to forget, Seigall has worked with the National Institute of Health. His resume spans back for over 30 years, and he has a long list of happy patients that will attest to all claims.

Higher quality cancer treatments is what the 21st century is all about. Some of the best technological-advancements have been introduced during this time, and these advancements are ground-breaking. At Seattle Genetics, this company has taken the game to an all-new level. It develops, commercializes and distributes its own proprietary drugs for the market. The company is Washington-based, and it has been visited by numerous politicians as well as visited by industry-insiders. There is also close to 1,000 employees here. With many more advanced drugs that are coming into the frame, the company will be expecting another boom of opening job positions. Siegall has used his brilliance, and his business-savvy sense to secure licensing deals with major pharmaceutical companies. Thanks to the collaboration with Takeda pharmaceutical, the company’s top drug is now being distributed and used across the globe.

Functionality, progression and diligence is being displayed here on a consistent basis. Remember, Seattle Genetics was just a little startup company back in the late 1990s, and it’s quite impressive to see how far it has come. All in all, Dr. Clay Siegall, and his patients are definitely winning in the fight against cancer, but bigger things are expected in the years to come.

Groupon founder Eric Lefkofsky sees opportunity in oncology’s disarray

When Eric Lefkofsky, co-founder of volume discount giant Groupon, got the news that his wife was suffering from advanced breast cancer, he was understandably distraught. But over the next few months of going in and out of oncology offices around Chicago, he became even more worried, not by the state of his wife’s disease, which her oncology team was, by that time, highly confident would beat, but by the state of oncology itself.

Specifically, Lefkofsky was aghast to realize that oncology experts, at some of Chicago’s most prestigious medical institutions, had less real-time access to data and analytics than many truck drivers. This led Lefkofsky to begin studying the problem on his own. Eventually, he came to the conclusion that there was massive room for improvement in the way that oncologists are fed data. And the analytic tools that were available to them were both crude and weak.

Lefkofsky eventually founded Tempus, an oncological analytics company dedicated to teasing out the crucial patterns in the vast reams of data that are potentially available to oncologists and other medical professionals. Once of the largest sources of untapped and unparsed data is the human genome itself. The use of genomic sequencing has exploded over the last 15 years, with the price of sequencing an average human genome dropping by a factor of more than 20,000 times. In 2003, the first human genome was sequenced at a cost of over $100,000,000. Today, a person’s genome can be totally sequenced for just $5,000. Lefkofsky predicts that figure will drop to just a few hundred dollars in the coming decades, as computer capacity advances and new techniques become known.

Lefkofsky is working at Tempus to create a system that can act as a sort of on-demand meta-study platform, conducting real-time, sophisticated cancer analysis that will put into the hands of oncologists the necessary relationships between patient characteristics and treatment options to enable them to create a totally customized treatment regimen.

Rather than all patients suffering from a form of cancer receiving a one-size-fits-all treatment, a highly granular approach will be taken, with no two patients getting exactly the same combination of drugs, course and duration.

About Eric Lefkofsky: www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20161001/ISSUE01/310019995/can-eric-lefkofsky-save-your-life